Indian Millennial Homebuyers: The Times Are Changing

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Anil Pharande, Chairman – Pharande Spaces

Everything that your parents may have communicated to you about owning a home may be incorrect if you are a millennial under the age of 35. However, don’t blame yourself for this – your parents operated by a rigid set of values that they have simply passed on to you. It was a simple enough formula – get a good education, get married, have kids and buy a big flat in the city. This is – or was – the quintessential Indian middle-class dream.

This dream – and the formula – may continue to have relevance to quite a few younger people in India, but the way life works for today’s millennials in India is no longer so cut and dried as it was for their parents. In the first place, we have a rapidly evolving and increasingly competitive job market in India.

The career charts of Indian millennials are no longer as predictable as those of their parents were – nor does a sound college education mean that one can actually get the best jobs anymore. Also, millennials are the ‘job hopping’ generation which wants to sample different lines of work and also different companies with varied work cultures before they ‘settle down.’ This is one reason why many Indian millennials initially prefer to rent rather than buy their homes.

Secondly, because their careers are no longer cast in the concrete of limited options like engineer, doctor, lawyer, banker or ‘Government job, young Indians today are marrying later and are not necessarily in a hurry to have children once they do, either. When they do decide on having children, having one child is, more often than not, enough. The typical millennial family of today is essentially nuclear and does not subscribe to the values that drove the much larger and much more complex joint family package.

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They are more flexible and value their freedom, so they are not overly invested in making heavy financial commitments as soon as they are able to (making such commitments was a defining factor of the previous generations of Indians).

What does this mean in terms of their home purchase decisions? For one thing, it means that a smaller flat – even for a dual-income household – is perfectly adequate to begin with. What increasingly matters for the young, smart socially conscious Indian nuclear family of today is not necessarily size, but:

  • Value for money (banks and developers should understand by now that dual income does not equal dual gullibility)
  • Being able to get to and from work conveniently (not because getting to work fast matters most, but because getting home faster leads to better work-life balance)
  • Good public transport connectivity (because using public transport is good for the family budget as well as the environment)
  • Two car parking spaces (because two earning members may need to be as mobile as possible)
  • Fast broadband + Wi-Fi connectivity and other smart home features (because many Indian millennials can and do work from home, or from home as well as an office)
  • Environmental sustainability of the project (because most Indian millennials do believe that the world can become a better place)

Upgrading to larger homes should be an option, but it is by no means the only acceptable path for the Indian millennial to follow. For the previous generations, the ‘upgradation’ route was more or less socially enforced – but that trend is now history.

Strangely, many residential developers in cities like Pune have not caught on to the reasons why their projects are not selling as fast as they used to. They choose to believe that it is because ‘market conditions’ are currently ‘slow’. That may be true, but the larger fact is that housing projects that appealed to their parents may not have the same attractiveness for today’s millennials.

Projects that do not meet the requirements of today’s younger generation of working professionals are not going to work for this buyer segment, regardless of the market conditions.

One truth about the real estate market has not changed, even for millennials – while it is not all about ‘location, location, location’ for them, location is still certainly very important. It’s just that ‘central location’ is no longer the Golden Rule – Indian millennials are far more inclined to purchase their first homes in the suburbs, not in the city centre.

They are also far more likely to buy homes in organized townships with stand-alone infrastructure and their own schools, healthcare and shopping / entertainment facilities. Townships with their own office complexes offering potential walk-to-work or cycle-to-work possibilities and those close to major employment hubs such as IT parks and manufacturing belts are the most preferred.

About The Author:

Anil PharandeAnil Pharande is Chairman of Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in West Pune. Pharande Promoters & Builders, the flagship company of Pharande Spaces and an ISO 9001-2000 certified company, is a pioneer in the PCMC area offering a diverse range of real estate products catering especially to the 42 sectors of Pradhikaran. The luxury township Puneville at Punavale in West Pune is among the company’s latest premium offerings. Woodsville in Moshi is another highly successful PCMC-based township by Pharande Spaces which is now in its 3rd phase.

Festive Season: Tips On Freebies And Offers On Property

– Anil Pharande, Chairman – Pharande Spaces

In Maharashtra, Diwali is definitely the time of choice for property buyers to invest in their dream home. In fact, property buyers look forward to this festival to sign the papers on their homes because this city cherishes this traditional time of investing in the future.

freeObviously, builders also respond to the vastly improved market sentiments and do all they can to sustain them. During the Diwali period, property buyers will be presented with a slew of offers which developers introduce to induce sales. The Diwali period this year will see a lot of such activity, because property developers are eager to create sufficient interest in their projects. The residential property market has seen slackness over the preceding months, and Diwali is the time that developers have been looking forward to as much as property buyers.

The question here is – do such ‘freebies’ constitute real value for property buyers? The answer to this does not depend solely on what is being offered. It is a normal market phenomenon for incentives to be offered during the festive season, but property buyers should consider the actual value of the property.

They should be cautious about extravagant freebies and take a close look at the factors that add or reduce value in the case of real estate. If the project is by a developer known for sub-standard construction, or if it is located in a ‘blind spot’ of the local real estate market, no amount of freebies can compensate. The property itself will not represent a good investment, and the buyer will not benefit in the long run.

Another aspect to watch out for is freebies being offered for properties in over-priced projects. At a time when property buyers seek the best options for their money, getting a free car along with an overpriced flat does not make sense. If the flats in this project do not represent good value for money, freebies will not improve the situation. If a buyer wants to buy a flat in Pune such a project, it is best to negotiate for a better price than to accept freebies – or ask for them in addition to a discount.

Home buyers should especially beware of freebies being offered by investors who have put their money into properties in locations that are known to be ‘overheated’ (in other words, where rates have been artificially inflated by excessive investor activity). In such cases, freebies are meant to act as psychological encouragements to make an unwise property purchase.

There are certain incentives that buyers can definitely take seriously. These are not in the form of cars or vacations, but represent actual savings to them. Such incentives include:

  • Reduced down-payments to book flats, with balance payable on possession, resulting in an extension of the period between booking and full payment. Normally, buyers would have to pay the balance as the building progresses
  • Waiver on stamp duty, VAT and registration charges
  • Free or significantly reduced clubhouse memberships
  • Free parking, furnishing, interior decoration and smart home features (which would otherwise be charged for)
  • Waiver on premium for floor-rise

About The Author:

Anil PharandeAnil Pharande is Chairman of Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in Western Pune. Pharande Promoters & Builders, the flagship company of Pharande Spaces and an ISO 9001-2000 certified company, is a pioneer in the PCMC area, offering a diverse range of real estate products catering especially to the 42 sectors of Pradhikaran. The luxury township Puneville at Punavale in West Pune is among the company’s latest premium offerings. Woodsville in Moshi is another highly successful PCMC-based township by Pharande Spaces which is now in its 3rd phase.

Be A Smart Property Buyer With A Pre-approved Home Loan

Anil-Pharande

 

 

 Anil Pharande, CMD – Pharande Spaces

Home buyers, and especially first-time buyers, would like to be in the best position to make their purchase once they have identified their dream home. The most challenging aspect of home ownership is invariably financing. Questions like which lending institution to approach, what loans should be applied for, how much loan to be applied for and how much time will it take for approval need to be answered.

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The best ‘be prepared’ move on this front is to become pre-approved for a home loan. Doing so means that this tricky and time-consuming aspect of home purchase has already been dealt with, and that one can enter the market focused squarely on the best options. Getting pre-approved also puts you in the strongest possible place when it comes to negotiating the best deal.

 

What is the difference between loan pre-qualification and pre-approval?

Pre-qualification for a home loan is more or less like an educated estimate provided by the lending company. They will be letting you know the type of loan you could qualify for, and the maximum amount. The estimate is usually based on your financial history, loan eligibility and buying power. A pre-approval, on the other hand, is a written confirmation by the lender.

Before handing over the pre-approval certificate, loan officers will completely access your employment and remuneration information and do a complete ‘credit-worthiness’ check. This involves collecting all the data related to your past and current debts, repayment history, disposable income, credit card record, etc. and running it through software that will calculate whether you could be a likely candidate for approval.

How to secure a pre-approved home loan?

While seeking to become pre-approved, it is always best to approach a lending company that you know or can be referred to by a friend, colleague or family member. The lender needs have the assurance that you are a credible borrower. However, do not stop searching after you have met the first possible lender.

Ask around and look for the lending institutions that that provide the most competitive interest rates and are known for their helpful customer service. The loan officer from the identified lending institute will then pay you a visit and help you streamline your financial statements so that you become ready to discuss your bank statements, investments, holdings, salary slips, income tax returns and other information related to your finances. This basically starts the process which will end with you becoming a pre-approved borrower.

What good will a letter of pre-approval do?

Firstly, a pre-approval letter lets you know the exact budget range you should be searching in. This helps you stay in sync with your financial reality and keeps you from allowing your focus to stray to properties that you cannot afford. Secondly, having a pre-approval letter means that you can grab an offer immediately when it comes across and is in your budget range.

The letter states that the finances are ready when you choose to ask for them. Important Note: it is highly advisable to work with lenders who have the ability to provide customized pre-approval letters, inclusive of the maximum purchase price. Sellers could get greedy if they see a greater loan amount than their quote.

Getting pre-approved for a home loan is a crucial step that can put you in the best possible position in the home buying process. It will give you both peace of mind and keep you focused on what what to look for and what to avoid in terms of affordability.

About The Author:

Anil Pharande is Chairman of Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in Western Pune. Pharande Promoters & Builders, the flagship company of Pharande Spaces and an ISO 9001-2000 certified company, is a pioneer in the PCMC area offering a diverse range of real estate products catering especially to the 42 sectors of Pradhikaran.

Gudi Padwa: The Festival of Renewal and Property Investment

Anil-Pharande

 

 

Anil Pharande, CMD – Pharande Spaces

India is a country of myriad traditions and festivals that are not only times of celebration but in many cases also major investment decisions. As a result, many market segments are also aligned to these periods. The Gudi Padwa festive season is among the periods of intense real estate market activity, because this period is traditionally seen as one of renewal and forward planning.

Gudi Padwa is a celebration of the coming of spring, during which nature once again delivers its gift of abundance after the largely barren winter months. In fact, this period is celebrated by almost every culture in the world in some form or the other. But probably nowhere with as much joy and fervour as in India, which is a country with very strong agrarian roots. It is no accident that Gudi Padwa coincides with many festivals all over India, from Baisakhi in Punjab, Puthandu in Tamil Nadu, Yugadi in Andhra Pradesh and Vishu in Kerala.

The cross-linkage of Gudi Padwa with real estate purchase is by no means a latter-day phenomenon – this trend has been in evidence since historical times. India is a country where certain times of the year as seen as very auspicious for any activity related to investment and wealth creation. A self-owned home is the biggest and most important investment for most Indian families, and the Gudi Padwa festive period invariably sees significantly increased property purchase activity.

This year, Gudi Padwa coincides with many other favourable market dynamics. Very much in keeping with the spirit of spring which Gudi Padwa celebrates, India has emerged from a prolonged period of political uncertainty and economic doldrums. A strong and resolute government has taken charge, and the Indian economy is visibly reviving. Across the country, Indians have put job insecurity and indecisiveness about their future goals behind them. However, the property market has not yet picked up concurrent pace, resulting in a very favourable scenario for home seekers this Gudi Padwa.

Depending on how the property market is behaving, developers roll out various offers and incentives to encourage buyers during the Gudi Padwa season. This year, such offers are going to be plentiful, but a more important dynamic we will see is that many developers who had refrained from lowering their rates may do so selectively this year under the guise of festival discounts. Without a doubt, the tradition-fuelled upswing in buyer sentiments must be harnessed during Gudi Padwa.

More than ever, home seekers intent on making their purchase this Gudi Padwa need to be guided by the right fundamentals. It is important to understand that when it comes to freebies and offers, the real estate market is no different from any other kind of market – an attractive offer only makes sense if it is attached to the right product. Considering the magnitude of investment one makes into a home – and also the purpose of this investment – it is very important to ensure that one is buying what one really wants and needs.

One of the best ways to maintain a clear focus while buying a home in a festive season is to make a list of the merits and demerits of every option one has short-listed first. Given the specific nature of home purchase, sufficient weightage must be given to location, the reputation of the developer, the facilities and amenities available, and of course overall value for money. If all these check out positively and are backed by an attractive offer or discount, one is on the way to making a good choice.

About The Author:

Anil Pharande is Chairman of Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in Western Pune. Pharande Promoters & Builders, the flagship company of Pharande Spaces and an ISO 9001-2000 certified company, is a pioneer in the PCMC area offering a diverse range of real estate products catering especially to the 42 sectors of Pradhikaran.

Affordable Housing In India – Where Is The Supply?

Affordable housing is a term we use for residential units in India’s urban areas which are affordably priced with respect to households that fall within a specific limited income range. There is no single set of parameters to define what an affordable housing unit should cost in India. This is because the pricing and feasibility to developers of affordable housing is a function of the city, location within the city, type of project being built and also the construction technology employed.

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In India, it is appropriate to judge the affordability of a home on three broad parameters – the monthly income of prospective buyers from the target segment, the size of the home and, of course, its price. There is another element that should be mentioned, namely the target clientele itself. We tend to look at the word ‘affordable’ solely in terms of the LIG (lower income group) segment. For this segment, affordable housing would mean 200-300 square foot dwellings priced at between 7-12 lakh.

But what about people who earn more than the average factory labourer but still cannot afford to buy a decent 1 BHK flat of 300-450 square feet within ten to fifteen kilometers of their workplaces? They too need affordable housing – housing appropriately priced for the middle class. The home buyers in this segment can afford to buy flats in the price range of Rs. 30-35 lakh via home loans.

Obviously, they expect a certain standard of living, comforts and facilities for this expense. However, but even such flats are hard to come by in our larger cities. This is the case even in Pune.

Today, around 30% of India’s population lives and works in urban areas. This means that they occupy less than 2% of the land available in the country. If we zoom in on Maharashtra, it emerges that close to 60% of the overall population lives in urban locations. Distressingly, a closer look at a city like Mumbai reveals that over 50% of its citizens live in slums. Mumbai’s slums occupy less than 4% of the land available in the city. Obviously, the affordable housing quotient has gone badly wrong in Pune’s prosperous neighbouring city. However, the problem is larger than just one city, which continues to get negative press only because of its exorbitantly high property rates and enormous annual inward migration.

Despite everything being said on the matter, the shortage of affordable housing in India is getting worse instead of better. The country’s urban population of 285 million has multiplied itself by five over the last half century. It is projected that it will continue to increase at this fast pace, and that 50% of all Indians will be living in urban areas by the end of the next three decades. So, if the shortage for housing for the lower income segment stands at 25 million today and there is no increase in the pace of supply of affordable housing launches, what will this figure look like in 30 years?

Let us look at the situation from a real estate market point of view. There is, in fact, a gigantic market for affordable housing in India. Currently, it is valued at anything between Rs. 5-10 trillion. What is really being done to address this huge market – especially the one constituted by the ever-growing middle class? There are next to no Government incentives for projects with flats in the Rs. 30-35 lakh bracket.

While the only answers to this question in Mumbai seem to lie in small projects on the far outskirts of the city, Pune presents a far more encouraging picture. Developers of township properties in Pune have now begun addressing this market with an internationally inspired property development model called integrated townships. This model is based on maximum value for money to buyers, based on high-grade common infrastructure and shared facilities in more cost-effective, yet progressive areas like the Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation.

With fully integrated township projects like Woodsville and Celestial City, we at Pharande Spaces have been successful in delivering affordable housing for the mid-income segment of home buyers in Pune and the PCMC area.  There are various reasons for this success.

For one, land for these integrated townships was acquired early on in upcoming locations such as Ravet and Moshi. This meant that the price of the finished products could be kept within the means of Pune property buyers. Secondly, townships like Woodsville and Celestial City are conceived and constructed on a model that allows luxurious facilities and amenities on an economy of scale. In other words, it is possible to provide luxurious features for all units in these projects on the basis of a large-scale master plan.

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Anil Pharande is Vice President – CREDAI (Pune Metro) and Chairman of Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in the PCMC area of Pune, India.

Pune Real Estate: From Kothrud To Wakad – And Beyond

Anil-Pharande

 

 

Anil Pharande, CMD – Pharande Spaces

In Pune, property and quality of life were once synonymous, but that can no longer be taken as a given. In earlier years, it did not really matter much where one chose to buy property in Pune – all locations were more or less supportive of peaceful family life in their own right.

Today, while considering flats for sale in Pune, one has to consider a number of variables – among them the levels of traffic congestion and pollution, the availability of basic facilities such as water and, of course, quality of the neighborhood.

Let us take Kothrud, for example. This once charming area was one of the first suburbs to be developed after the old city. Even today, it is considered a desirable core area due to its strong connection with the city centre via Karve Road. However, for better or for worse, Kothrud is also mentioned in the Guinness Book of World Records as the suburb with the fastest urban growth in the world.

Kothrud started developing in late 90s. Back then, Pune City was truly a Pensioner’s Paradise, with little economic activity. People from Mumbai looking to buy property in Pune preferred Kothrud, naturally leading to an accelerated rate of development.

By the time the IT/ITES boom began in 2000-02, Kothrud was a full-fledged residential destination. Because of this, it fortunately did not go the way of suburbs like Aundh and Baner in the West or Viman Nagar in the East as they joined the IT/ITES bandwagon.

Over the past decade-and-a-half, Kothrud has evolved as one of the most densely populated residential destination in Pune. Residential projects are very scarce and the demand is enormous. However, because of the manner in which it grew, Kothrud was not developed holistically in terms of social infrastructure.

Many other areas in Pune developed on similar lines, and the old Pensioner’s Paradise charm soon gave way to massive, relentless development. This began the hunt for less cluttered and more lifestyle-supportive residential locations.

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Fortunately, Pune is not a sea-locked city like Mumbai, and there was scope for looking further ahead. One of the first areas to emerge as a preferred area to settle down was Wakad – a once-nondescript village with 5000 locals who farmed sugarcane, onion and groundnut in its rich, black, fertile soil.

In 1983, the Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation (PCMC) acquired 50% of this virgin location. By 1998, PCMC counted Wakad as one of its areas. Today, Wakad has emerged as the focus of younger, financially fit families that are looking to upgrade their lifestyle by moving to larger, more nature-endowed homes on the outskirts of Pune City.

With the increasing congestion of the previously preferred area of Aundh, neighboring Wakad was seen as the perfect location, with close proximity to the Infotech and Biotech Parks at Hinjewadi, the Pimpri-Chinchwad Industrial area, the Mumbai-Bangalore Bypass, the Super Express Highway to Mumbai and the Balewadi National Sports complex.  Thanks to the Expressway, Wakad is only about 80 to 90 minutes away from Mumbai, and Mumbaikars looking to buy property in Pune saw it as an excellent value proposition.

Of course, Wakad is just one of the chapters that the Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation has in its book of Pune real estate successes. Today, Ravet and other sectors of Pradhikaran in the PCMC have become the new residential real estate watchwords in Pune. These areas are developing fast and are even now venues of extremely modern integrated residential projects.

However, the development of Wakad marked the beginning of a new residential real estate trend in Pune – the quest for better environments to settle down in and recapture some of Pune’s erstwhile glory as Queen of the Deccan.

Anil Pharande is Vice President of CREDAI Pune Metro and Chairman of Pharande  Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in the PCMC area of Pune, India.

Pune Real Estate: The Price Of Rapid Urbanization

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By the most recent reckoning, India’s population currently hovers around the 1.15 billion mark. It is estimated that by 2030, this figure will have grown to around 1.53 billion. India’s urban areas are just about ready to burst at the seams, on the heels of an accelerating population explosion.

The population growth in India’s rural areas in the present decade is around 18%, and over 30% in the urban areas. This pattern of urbanisation is seen as encouraging, since it seems to indicate that India will attain the global urbanization standard average in the course of the next decade.

However, it is also true that this upsurge in our cities’ population is putting available civic structures like public transport, water supply, drainage, sewerage and obviously the supply of housing under severe pressure.

This raises the question – how are India’s real estate developers addressing the problem of insufficient infrastructure in and around their projects in the main cities? The fact is, they can’t do much.

In cities like Pune, property buyers have no choice but to turn a blind eye to the absence of sufficient infrastructure. They are aware of the fact that they will face numerous inconveniences, but what can they do?

Many opt to buy into projects that boast of compensatory measures to overcome the infrastructure deficit. These would include independent water supply if a reliable municipal pipeline doesn’t exist, electricity backup to make up for unreliable power supply and sump pits if the area does not have adequate sewage.

However, such projects in Pune City are few and far between, and homes in them come at extremely high prices. Also, no matter in how many ways Pune developers compensate for lack of civic infrastructure, they cannot add more than a token patch of landscaped lawn by ways of natural ambience.

The high property rates are a real problem. Many of those who buy flats in Pune have saved all their lives for buying their Pune dream home. They have made a lot of sacrifices to make this happen; having finally managed to save enough, they buy their homes and immediately regret it.

The maintenance costs for their flats are far too high for them to bear – a lot of them can’t afford petrol for their cars anymore. They travel to and from work by bus.

We have all looked at the parking lots of highly-priced residential projects and seen dusty cars with handmade posters on the rear windows saying things like ‘Homemade Detergent Soap Available at Flat 12A’ and ‘Tuition For Stds. V to IX – Contact Mr. XYZ at Flat 26C.

It simply makes no sense to invest everything in a home and then live in financial stress afterward. The solution obviously lies in finding a home where the same investment buys you more.

The choice is between paying a certain amount on a small, under-equipped flat in the crowded central city or on a spacious home in a location blessed with natural beauty and and sound infrastructure.

The Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation, which planned its residential areas decades ago, offers such options. The integrated residential projects in Ravet and other sectors of Pradhikaran close to the upcoming International Convention Centre offer the kind of homes that Puneites have always dreamed of, but never been able to own.

The Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation also has an extremely vibrant economy, offering more and more job opportunities across all business sectors with every passing year.

Finally, because of the regulated nature of the PCMC real estate market and the high emphasis on civic facilities and amenities, there is no question of an eventual infrastructure deadlock. The real estate prices are way below those see in Pune, too. For that reason, these are the kind of homes that will be sources of joy for several generations.

Anil Pharande is Chaiman – Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm operating in the PCMC area of Pune, India.

You may reprint or quote this article with full credit to the author and a link back to PunePropertyBlog.com

Where Are India’s Budget Homes?

Anil Pharande

The concept of affordable housing in India sounds simple enough, but nothing could be more complex than this subject. We all know that India needs more budget homes, but where are they?

Trends come and go. Developers’ business agendas change along with the dynamics of the real estate market. However, the dire need for compassionately priced homes remains. Of course, there are quite a few developers who are addressing the demand for affordable housing. Nevertheless, if we consider the sheer vastness of the demand, their offerings don’t make even make a dent in it.

Pune PropertySoon after the real estate market revival after the Lehman-induced global financial crash, it did seem as though the Indian developers had finally woken up. A huge number of them focused squarely on developing affordable housing projects. The inflexible demand for such homes in our larger cities and their further suburbs meant was their ticket out of financial trouble.

And then the economy revived, and it kept on reviving. Suddenly, home buyers with lower incomes were no longer in fear of their jobs. The stock market revived, and capital began to flow into the real estate sector again. This was good news for the real estate market in general, but bad news for the affordable housing sector. Greed took over again, and the focus of developers once again shifted to higher-priced premium housing.

Premium homes were an attractive segment for developers in 2006-07, and there were many project launches aimed squarely at India’s more affluent classes. The global economic downturn put a brake on this trend only through the worst period of 2008 and 2009. In this period, it did seem as though affordable housing was going to get its due share of attention at last. However, they did not take long to concentrate on premium housing again.

So – where does the common man stand today? What has happened to affordable housing? Was it no more than a passing trend to tide developers over during the leaner economic period? Budget home launches have reduced a lot. In fact, even mid-income homes in many of our cities have become so expensive that demand for them has slowed down.

It cannot be said that nothing at all is happening in terms of budget homes in India. There are commendable efforts still being made by conscientious, smart developers to cater to the housing needs of the lower-income groups. However, it is not enough. The shortage in this segment is still huge. The Government has come out with special schemes for affordable housing for builders, but most of them are not taking up the opportunities.

We are now faced with an escalating problem. More and more people who can be classified as slum dwellers are obtaining good jobs, and are able to afford homes in the bracket of Rs. 7-12 lakh. It is only because there is no supply of homes in this bracket that they continue to live in slums and run-down chawls. The affordable rental housing projects that were announced earlier with so much fanfare are not happening in the required numbers.

This means that India now has vast numbers of people who could live in better conditions, but are unable to. Because of the continued demand for accommodation in slums, it is harder than ever to eradicate them. Slum redevelopment can only take place on a significant scale if the resistance to it decreases.

Anil-PharandeAnil Pharande is President of CREDAI PCMC and Chairman of Pharande  Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in the PCMC area of Pune, India.

This article may be reprinted with proper attribution to the author and a link back to PunePropertyBlog.com

Pune Property – The Advent Of Transparent Real Estate Deals

Pune PropertyAnna Hazare and his fight against corruption were all over the news for the better part of the month. There was a lot of food for thought for everyone, including property market stakeholders. While there was no direct reference to the immense amounts of black money in real estate, Anna Hazare obviously addressed this aspect in his crusade, as well.

In this context, it is pertinent to note a recent testimonial by a senior representative of a leading international property consultancy here in Pune.  His statement was in response to a request for his views on the subject of corruption and black money in the Indian real estate sector.

He pointed out that the subject of corruption in real estate is bound to crop up again and again, especially in light of the scams that rocked the news bulletins just a few months ago. However, he also correctly pointed out that stricter scrutiny for and measures against the movement of black money in the sector are already being enforced. Nevertheless, he stated, we are still in the early days of our battle against corruption in various business segments, and that it will take time to completely subdue its effects.

Anna Hazare himself would not dispute this fact. The rot of corruption has set in over a number of years, and has therefore sunk rather deeply into it at various levels. To weed it out completely will take time, but the sanitation process can be accelerated with greater consumer awareness. After all, corruption in real estate is fed both at the supplier and consumer ends. Thankfully, this syndrome is already on the decline because of increasing awareness among Indian property buyers.

The traditional viewpoint of black money driving Indian real estate is obsolete in many ways by now. In Pune, property buyers should be aware of the fact that many of today’s larger, reputed developers are already offering completely transparent deals. The prevalence of such developers is, in fact, higher in Pune than in neighbouring Mumbai. Pune property buyers have the option of patronizing such developers.

The times when Pune property buyers were completely at the mercy of corrupt small-time developers are long over. Those looking for homes in Pune are no longer limited in their options. The more prominent developers in Pune have long since recognized the need for greater transparency in the system. After all, the largest component of Pune residential property buyers is made up by the salaried class, who do not have large cash reserves and often need 100% funding on home loans.

However, there are also larger reasons why Pune real estate is becoming more transparent. The Pune property market is a focal point for foreign investors who are attracted by the immense potential it presents. Residential developments around the Hinjewadi and Kharadi IT hubs as well as the integrated townships of Primpri-Chinchwad are drawing massive investments from from domestic and international investors. With the exposure to global funds, the sector has matured rapidly and transparency is becoming a norm.

In addressing the issue of corruption in Indian real estate, it is important to note that there will always be supply where there is demand. A corrupt system holds illegal advantages for both the buyer and the seller. If more and more sellers are willing to offer clean deals, it is to be hoped that more and more buyers will opt for such deals. only then will we be truly on the way to a corruption-free real estate market.

pharande spaces logoPharande  Spaces is a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in the PCMC area of Pune, India.

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Posted by: K. D. Nagarkar

Pimpri Chinchwad civic body picks 6,720 people for EWS housing

Anil-Pharande

 

 

Anil Pharande, CMD – Pharande Spaces

(DNA, Aug 24, 2011)

The Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation (PCMC) on Tuesday identified 6,720 beneficiaries through draw of lots for its housing scheme for people falling in the economically weaker section (EWS).

The draw of lots took place at Ankush Landge auditorium in Bhosari. The PCMC has uploaded the list of beneficiaries on its website, www.pcmcindia.gov.in.

The PCMC is constructing 13,250 houses under the Jawaharlal Nehru national urban renewal mission (JNNURM) scheme for people in the EWS category.

In the first phase, 6,720 dwellings are supposed to be handed over. The first phase of the project is being implemented on a plot of 75 acres in Sectors 17 and 19 given by the Pimpri-Chinchwad New Township Development Authority (PCNTDA).

The PCMC had received 14,032 applications for the dwellings in Phase I. Pimpri-Chinchwad municipal commissioner, Ashish Sharma, said the 6,720 beneficiaries have to pay Rs50,000 within 45 days as the first installment.

The initial cost of each flat under the scheme was Rs 1.5 lakh, but later went up to Rs3.76 lakh due to cost escalation.

“The civic officials will verify whether beneficiaries possess any properties and if found, the names of such beneficiaries will be withdrawn from the list,” he said.

The beneficiaries will be allotted any of the flats in the EWS scheme. After the hand-over of the flats, a society will be formed.

In 2007, the Union government gave primary approval to the PCMC proposal to implement the EWS housing scheme for JNNURM, estimated to cost Rs449.7 crore.

http://www.dnaindia.com/mumbai/report_pimpri-chinchwad-civic-body-picks-6720-people-for-ews-housing_1579256