Indian Millennial Homebuyers: The Times Are Changing

millennial

Anil Pharande, Chairman – Pharande Spaces

Everything that your parents may have communicated to you about owning a home may be incorrect if you are a millennial under the age of 35. However, don’t blame yourself for this – your parents operated by a rigid set of values that they have simply passed on to you. It was a simple enough formula – get a good education, get married, have kids and buy a big flat in the city. This is – or was – the quintessential Indian middle-class dream.

This dream – and the formula – may continue to have relevance to quite a few younger people in India, but the way life works for today’s millennials in India is no longer so cut and dried as it was for their parents. In the first place, we have a rapidly evolving and increasingly competitive job market in India.

The career charts of Indian millennials are no longer as predictable as those of their parents were – nor does a sound college education mean that one can actually get the best jobs anymore. Also, millennials are the ‘job hopping’ generation which wants to sample different lines of work and also different companies with varied work cultures before they ‘settle down.’ This is one reason why many Indian millennials initially prefer to rent rather than buy their homes.

Secondly, because their careers are no longer cast in the concrete of limited options like engineer, doctor, lawyer, banker or ‘Government job, young Indians today are marrying later and are not necessarily in a hurry to have children once they do, either. When they do decide on having children, having one child is, more often than not, enough. The typical millennial family of today is essentially nuclear and does not subscribe to the values that drove the much larger and much more complex joint family package.

testing

They are more flexible and value their freedom, so they are not overly invested in making heavy financial commitments as soon as they are able to (making such commitments was a defining factor of the previous generations of Indians).

What does this mean in terms of their home purchase decisions? For one thing, it means that a smaller flat – even for a dual-income household – is perfectly adequate to begin with. What increasingly matters for the young, smart socially conscious Indian nuclear family of today is not necessarily size, but:

  • Value for money (banks and developers should understand by now that dual income does not equal dual gullibility)
  • Being able to get to and from work conveniently (not because getting to work fast matters most, but because getting home faster leads to better work-life balance)
  • Good public transport connectivity (because using public transport is good for the family budget as well as the environment)
  • Two car parking spaces (because two earning members may need to be as mobile as possible)
  • Fast broadband + Wi-Fi connectivity and other smart home features (because many Indian millennials can and do work from home, or from home as well as an office)
  • Environmental sustainability of the project (because most Indian millennials do believe that the world can become a better place)

Upgrading to larger homes should be an option, but it is by no means the only acceptable path for the Indian millennial to follow. For the previous generations, the ‘upgradation’ route was more or less socially enforced – but that trend is now history.

Strangely, many residential developers in cities like Pune have not caught on to the reasons why their projects are not selling as fast as they used to. They choose to believe that it is because ‘market conditions’ are currently ‘slow’. That may be true, but the larger fact is that housing projects that appealed to their parents may not have the same attractiveness for today’s millennials.

Projects that do not meet the requirements of today’s younger generation of working professionals are not going to work for this buyer segment, regardless of the market conditions.

One truth about the real estate market has not changed, even for millennials – while it is not all about ‘location, location, location’ for them, location is still certainly very important. It’s just that ‘central location’ is no longer the Golden Rule – Indian millennials are far more inclined to purchase their first homes in the suburbs, not in the city centre.

They are also far more likely to buy homes in organized townships with stand-alone infrastructure and their own schools, healthcare and shopping / entertainment facilities. Townships with their own office complexes offering potential walk-to-work or cycle-to-work possibilities and those close to major employment hubs such as IT parks and manufacturing belts are the most preferred.

About The Author:

Anil PharandeAnil Pharande is Chairman of Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in West Pune. Pharande Promoters & Builders, the flagship company of Pharande Spaces and an ISO 9001-2000 certified company, is a pioneer in the PCMC area offering a diverse range of real estate products catering especially to the 42 sectors of Pradhikaran. The luxury township Puneville at Punavale in West Pune is among the company’s latest premium offerings. Woodsville in Moshi is another highly successful PCMC-based township by Pharande Spaces which is now in its 3rd phase.

PCMC – India’s Best-Planned Real Estate Market

Anil-Pharande

 

 

 

Anil Pharande, Chairman – Pharande Spaces

Planning In Real Estate

Planning is an inalienable component of real estate development. This is why buildings are engineered, not built randomly. While developing a project, this means that the builder follows a pre-determined design provided by an architect, who has based his or her design on proven engineering principles.

This planning ensures that the building’s structure has a prescribed foundation depth and distributes weight uniformly so that it can withstand internal and external stresses. The engineering aspect of project design also ensures that living units are proportionate and that the available space within them is optimally used.

estate-152518_640

In a residential complex, the planning aspect is extrapolated beyond individual buildings. The architect’s job is to engineer the project in such a manner than the buildings are distributed according to plan across the plot, and that open spaces, parking spaces, internal roads and common utilities are exactly where they are supposed to be. In larger townships, the planning aspect becomes even more involved because of the larger area.

Planned Cities

All these are expected factors when it comes to real estate projects. But when such detailed planning is applied to an entire city, its benefits are vastly magnified. Architects, engineers, town planners, government agencies and builders approach the development of the whole city as though it were one large integrated complex.

This takes a huge amount of planning, coordination, investment and effort, but the results are obviously worth it. This is how the Pimpri-Chinchwad Municipal Corporation came into being. This is what sets it apart from other cities and into the same bracket as other planned municipalities like Chandigarh.

Today, the PCMC is a model city which is the result of careful planning of economic, social and real estate development. Unlike in the other regions in Pune, PCMC’s town planning authorities have scrupulously shielded the city from the ad-hoc development that has paralyzed the rest of Pune. The futuristic thinking and high vigilance that has been employed in developing this region has resulted in an avant-garde satellite city which adds a whole new dimension to the Pune’s real estate market.

Planned Cities Which Began Well And Ended In Chaos

From the start, planning authorities of the PCMC were determined not to repeat the mistakes committed in other cities which were originally meant to be immaculately planned municipalities. They started off on the right note, but the planning aspect soon decayed and gave way to the kind of unregulated growth that has destroyed the urban fabric of most Indian cities today. Some of the examples of failed attempts to produce planned municipalities in India are:

  • West India: Navi Mumbai and the Kalyan-Dombivili and Virar-Vasai belts
  • North India: The Ghaziabad-Gurgaon-Faridabad-Greater Noida corridor
  • South India: Bangalore’s Devanhalli-Yelahanka and Chennai’s Siruseri-Sriperumbadur belts
  • East India: Kolkata’s Rajarhat-Batanagar-Kalyani belt.

In each of the above cases, what had begun as a regulated real estate development process soon turned to a commercial expansion. PCMC on the other hand, adopted a smarter blueprint from the start. No scope had been given to nearsighted development. PCMC was always meant to be the city of the future where residents could enjoy the benefits of 100% infrastructure-based, community-oriented real estate planning and development.

Real Estate Demand Drivers In PCMC

Demand for residential real estate in a successful satellite city is created when there is a right balance of infrastructure, a stress-free lifestyle and employment opportunities. Additionally, there has to be good connectivity to the parent city. In context of PCMC, these are:

  • Road and rail connectivity to Pune
  • Its highly-planned business and industrial zones create countless new jobs every year
  • Infrastructure is vastly superior when compared to Central Pune
  • Real estate development is strictly dictated by a pre-planned urbanization model that ensures high living standards for all

PCMC is a perfect example of how satellite cities can surpass the central city. Here, the retail, commercial and residential markets work together symbiotically to create a winning proposition for end users and investors alike. When compared to Pune, PCMC has a much higher availability of green spaces, superior social fabric and vastly better infrastructure. Thanks to better land availability, PCMC also provides the most opportunities for real estate developers to create large integrated townships, which have are nothing short of a blessing for Pune’s residents.

About The Author:

Anil Pharande is Chairman of Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in Western Pune. Pharande Promoters & Builders, the flagship company of Pharande Spaces and an ISO 9001-2000 certified company, is a pioneer in the PCMC area offering a diverse range of real estate products catering especially to the 42 sectors of Pradhikaran. The luxury township Puneville at Punavale in West Pune is among the company’s latest premium offerings.