Infrastructure And its Correlation to Home Buying

Pharande Vaarivana Pune

Anil Pharande, Chairman – Pharande Spaces

In India, as in other countries, it is a simple fact that localities which are as close as possible to important workplace areas will be most consistently sought out by people looking to buy homes. Therefore, projects with great connectivity by railway and road, see the highest demand for residential properties.

Property investment is always driven by the infrastructure in and around a locality. From sufficient roads to reliable water supply and drainage, infrastructure includes all the physical characteristics which contribute towards creating sustainable communities. Unsurprisingly, property costs close to infrastructure including airports, railway stations and roads are higher than in other regions.

If a location does not offer reliable electricity and water supply, connectivity, public transportation stops and sanitation by ways of good sewerage and waste disposal, it will not work as a residential destination regardless of what else it offers. All these are services that nobody living in a modern Indian city is prepared to live without.

From a property marketplace outlook, sufficient infrastructure in an area includes everything that leads to an easier, convenient lifestyle which does not have to contend with any kind of shortages, service outages and breakdown of public facilities.

Well-planned roads and public transport

Roads are required to make transport quicker and simpler. They are important right from the time when basic infrastructure and initial real estate development are being put in place, as raw materials and labour has to be able to reach the location. Once the area is established, roads let people travel to and from work, for kids to get to and from school and for access to shopping and entertainment.

Proper planning of road, rail and public transport nodes is very important. The key factor to be kept in mind during this planning is that people do not want to too close to bus depots, railway stations, shopping areas and industries businesses – but neither will they wish to be too far away from them.

Reliable supply of essential utilities

In a developing country like India, there are still many towns and suburbs of cities that do not enjoy reliable water and electricity supply, garbage management and public security features. With the income of typical Indian families constantly growing, today’s urban homeowners are willing to spend more to get access to seamless water and electricity, and adequate security.

Naturally, residential complexes that provide 24×7 water and electricity supply and round-the-clock security are far now highly favored. This is what has led to the growing momentum of township development in Pune and even more so in PCMC. Housing projects in places that don’t have reliable utilities and where security is a concern do find takers – but these are usually exceptionally budget-strung buyers who resign themselves to having to wait for everything to fall in place at some stage.

Sanitation infrastructure

In India, there has been rising awareness of the minimum levels of sanitation that a household should have access to. A new location will only start attracting real demand from homebuyers if it offers appropriate measures of sanitation such as municipal road cleaning, trash removal, sewage and waste water disposal, and other related services. Without these services, life becomes unhealthy and intolerable. A location’s score on the sanitation front is a very important criterion for homebuyers who are shortlisting housing projects in which to buy a property.

Social infrastructure: Schools, hospitals, shopping and recreation

Indian families put great onus on the availability of schools in a residential neighbourhood. This is why areas with good schools in the vicinity fetch higher property rates than most others. This is not only a question of convenience for Indian parents, but also of the safety for their children. Because of life’s uncertainties and the rise in road and domestic accidents, hospitals are another component in an area’s social infrastructure that is of critical concern for homebuyers. They expect quick access to medical facilities –  this is non-negotiable.

Recreational open spaces such as parks are also consistently in favour from city dwellers that wish to experience nature to some extent, and thereby be able to find some refuge from the urban madness that rules most of their days. A locality that offers water bodies, gardens, parks and playgrounds in the vicinity are considered premium.

Developers of large integrated townships are aware of how important the availability of good social infrastructure has become, which is why they include gardens and artificial lakes as well as schools, shopping and entertainment inside the project premises for their residents.

Infrastructure in all its facets is therefore hugely important in today’s residential property scenario, and it directly influences the buying behavior of Indians scouting around for homes. The degree to which social and civic infrastructure is available in a neighbourhood dictates how successful a residential destination is today.

This is why integrated townships have become the most important trend on the Indian property market today. Townships are not dependent on how proactive the municipality and private sector players in deploying social and physical infrastructure. They deploy it themselves in perfectly-contained microcosms that not only include residential projects but also office and retail complexes as well as educational and healthcare facilities.

Integrated townships ensure that their residents have everything they need for a modern comfortable and secure lifestyle accessible within easy reach, for instant use. The high demand for township properties in rapidly urbanizing cities like Pune and PCMC vouchsafes the fact that homebuyers are no longer willing to compromise on the advantages of sufficient infrastructure in their neighbourhoods.

About The Author:

Pharande Vaarivana Pune

Anil Pharande is Chairman of Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in West Pune. Pharande Promoters & Builders, the flagship company of Pharande Spaces and an ISO 9001-2000 certified company, is a pioneer in the PCMC area offering a diverse range of real estate products catering especially to the 42 sectors of Pradhikaran. The luxury township Puneville at Punavale in West Pune is among the company’s latest premium offerings. Woodsville in Moshi is another highly successful PCMC-based township by Pharande Spaces which is now in its 3rd phase.

A Review of The PCMC Property Market in 2016

– Anil Pharande, Chairman – Pharande Spaces

As the new year dawns, India’s real estate market has begun navigating the potentially choppy seas of 2017 with a lot of uncertainty. When it comes to the past year, it is safe to say that nothing went as anticipated for the property market. The hoped- for recovery in the residential sector did not happen, and the Government’s unexpected demonetisation move in early November put paid to any chances for a last-minute turnaround.

Robust economy: Through the entire gamut of churn and setbacks in 2016, only one city’s real estate market managed to hold its own and even achieve some modest growth. West Pune, with its dominant market PCMC (Pimpri-Chinchwad Municipal Corporation), has always been a unique as it rides on an unbeatable trinity of residential demand drivers – manufacturing, Information Technology and the services sector. This equation has perennially acted like a healthily diversified investment portfolio, with the inherent strength of one or two of these sectors compensating for the occasional de-growth in the others. As always, this factor came to the rescue of the PCMC residential market.

Employment still drives housing demand: While the manufacturing sector in PCMC has always been robust thanks to the MIDC belt, continued growth in IT and the various services streams additionally ensured that the employment graph remained strong. With job creation continuing to drive the demand for homes, Pimpri-Chinchwad Municipal Corporation crossed the finish line of 2016 ahead of the other major cities – with room to spare. Though the demand for prime and luxury housing has remained somewhat subdued, budget and mid-income housing saved the day. If anything, 2016 amply illustrated that the middle class in Pune and PCMC has become extremely choosy about its home purchases.

Unsold inventory: Many of Pune’s peripheral areas – the hot investment favourites of 2014-15 – saw a depressing build-up of unsold supply even in completed projects. The lack of support infrastructure and known deficiencies such as inadequate or non-existent water supply put paid to many a developer’s hopes of selling his stock solely on the basis of enticingly low rates and freebies.

Of course, every large city in the country has its share of unsold inventory today, either because of muted market sentiment, the fact that a lot of supply is still in the early stages of construction, supply in the wrong locations, or unrealistic pricing of certain projects by developers. In the case of West Pune, most of the non-selling oversupply has been in locations lacking infrastructure. In PCMC, the supply overhang is largely from smaller developers without a good track record and credibility on the market.

Evolving buyer preferences: Diwali, the traditional period for increased home purchases in Pune, saw very few takers for inferior projects in inferior locations. Even the prospect of acquiring larger homes than their current ones did not draw mid-income buyers to lagging locations. On the other hand, there was a distinct uptick for smaller but ‘high-performance’ homes in properly connected areas. The accent was on a high degree of facilitation within such projects.

Price corrections: With 2016 bringing a slow but steady erosion of property pricing in most of its markets, some of the previously unaffordable locations in West Pune / PCMC have once again become attainable to homebuyers. If Budget 2017-18 brings the hoped-for benefits for first-time property buyers and the RBI rolls out lower interest rates, there is every reason to expect a major revival in home buying sentiment – and it is the superior locations which will see the highest demand.

Outlook for 2017

The trend of the real estate market in Pune and PCMC performing against the larger odds will definitely continue. Not only do the twin cities have all the right economic and demand drivers firmly in place, but their inclusion in the 100 Smart Cities program will only increase the interest from multinational companies to set up and expand operations here. This will, in turn, increase inward migration and fuel greater demand from investors, even as local end-user demand continues unabated.

While the bulk of demand today comes from end-users, investors are still very much a force on Pune’s property market. The city offers several budget bandwidths and property typologies into which one can invest. Well-timed and properly researched real estate purchases can reap very satisfactory returns.

However, it should be borne in mind that not every kind of investment pays off equally in Pune – one needs to know precisely how each sub-market works, what it responds to and where the demand is headed. A poorly-judged property investment can be a disappointing proposition. Particularly, investors need to be wary of the cheap, potentially illegal ‘gray market’ residential constructions happening on the outskirts.

About The Author:
 

Pharande Vaarivana PuneAnil Pharande is Chairman of Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in West Pune. Pharande Promoters & Builders, the flagship company of Pharande Spaces and an ISO 9001-2000 certified company, is a pioneer in the PCMC area offering a diverse range of real estate products catering especially to the 42 sectors of Pradhikaran. The luxury township Puneville at Punavale in West Pune is among the company’s latest premium offerings. Woodsville in Moshi is another highly successful PCMC-based township by Pharande Spaces which is now in its 3rd phase.

More Scope For Green Development In PCMC

The PCMC is one of the pioneering regions in the country to embrace the concepts and principles of sustainable development, and I myself have always been a strong advocate for the green way of life.

Pharande Vaarivana PuneThe use of green building technology, non-conventional energy sources and sustainable waste water management does not only have a positive impact on the environment but also on the overall quality of our lives. Moreover, adoption of sustainable building and living practices reduce the strain on municipal resources, resulting in significant revenue savings which can then be used to build better infrastructure and provide even more services to the people.

I would like to touch on PCMC’s major thrust towards sustainable real estate development. It is no secret that green development is the future of real estate all over the world. In fact, many of the bigger residential townships and commercial complexes in the PCMC have already adopted the ‘green development’ mantra. Many of the developers active here have started to take sustainable real estate development seriously and begun launching Green Homes.

To date, there are around 60 registered green buildings completed or under construction in the PCMC. The new PCNTDA building itself is a resounding statement to how important sustainable development has become to the city.

Obviously, the Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation is taking its mission to provide cleaner, greener homes to its citizens very seriously. But I must also add that we still have a long way to go. In my opinion, there is still not enough enthusiasm within the region about the benefits of green homes and workplaces. One of the reasons for this is lack of awareness.

And despite all the progress that has been made, there should be more determination by the PCMC to encourage and promote developers who are taking the Green cause seriously. I still see a great deal of disconnect between developers, agencies like GRIHA, the environment department and the building permissions agencies. Permissions for green buildings should be fast-tracked and be given preferential status. But this is still not to be seen, and it is quite disappointing.

Such disconnect is not worthy of a mighty and progressive municipality like the PCMC. Everything that happens here should be a benchmark for other regions to follow. The PCMC should be the most encouraging and determined of all the regions to promote and develop green real estate. There should be attractive incentives for both developers and consumers of green real estate. Only in such an environment can we hope to see PCMC become and remain the leader in sustainability.

I look forward to an era when this will happen, so that everyone associated with the PCMC can benefit and be proud of its efforts. This is my vision for a better tomorrow for the citizens and all stakeholders of PCMC, India’s most progressive municipal corporation. Jai Hind. Jai Maharashtra.

About The Author:

Pharande Vaarivana PuneAnil Pharande is Chairman of Pharande Spaces, a leading construction and development firm that develops township properties in Western Pune. Pharande Promoters & Builders, the flagship company of Pharande Spaces and an ISO 9001-2000 certified company, is a pioneer in the PCMC area offering a diverse range of real estate products catering especially to the 42 sectors of Pradhikaran. The luxury township Puneville at Punavale in West Pune is among the company’s latest premium offerings.

PCMC In 25 Years – A Fast Forward Into The Future

Anil-Pharande
 
 
Anil Pharande on his vision and his expectations of the PCMC of the future
The Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation follows a real estate model that has proven to be the most progressive and sustainable all over the world. The essence of this model is ‘planned development’ or ‘controlled urbanization’. PCMC is a twin city to Pune, but in that respect is uniquely different. Pune’s real estate development has not followed any sort of plan, and it is not hard to see it as a smaller version of chaotic Mumbai in less than 25 years.
A HOMOGENEOUS, MULTI-FACETED MOSAIC
In the same time span, PCMC will have attained its fullest potential as a model city of the future. Obviously, it will look very different from what we see today. It will have grown exponentially, into a harmonized montage of large industrial units, IT Parks, hotels, shopping and entertainment plazas, educational institutes and healthcare facilities – towering above public parks and gardens and crisscrossed with multi-lane roads and flyovers.
Further, the additional 25,000 acres of land that have come within the PCMC jurisdiction by virtue of the last Development Plan will eventually result in the addition of at least 2 million new homes. These homes will cater to every social stratum of property buyers, from the lower to the high income segments.
HORIZONTAL AND VERTICAL EXPANSION – CREATING A SPECTACULAR SKYLINE
In other words, there will be tremendous – yet controlled – horizontal real estate growth over the next 25 years. Most spaces allocated for residential use will have been utilized for that purpose. But this will not result in an urban jungle, since the PCMC planning blueprint will enforce the maintenance of vast green spaces at all stages of development.
Moreover, the Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation will at all times endorse self-sufficient real estate developments such as townships and other integrated residential projects. The authorities have long since recognized that these are the most sustainable and progressive models for optimum real estate growth. These projects will ensure a scientific uniformity to the horizontal growth.
However, even these 25,000 acres will not suffice, since PCMC will have to accommodate a massive demand for housing. The following graph illustrates this point – it charts the population growth in PCMC over the last 25 years, and clearly depicts that this growth has been almost ten-fold (from 200,000 to 2 million).
graphAs the graph below indicates, there is reason to believe that population growth is likely to cross 50 lakhs (5 million)  by 2035
This growth will be fuelled by several factors. On the one hand, there will be a huge requirement for homes from the rapidly growing manufacturing sectors of Pimpri-Chinchwad and the Chakan-Talegaon belt. Chakan itself, though a burgeoning industrial hub, has little to offer by ways of residential facilities. The onus naturally falls on PCMC, which will necessarily be the residential location of choice for the entrepreneurs and employees of these units.
Simultaneously, there will be the spill-over effect from Pune City (which will have reached complete saturation point in the next 25 years). We further have to factor in the ever-increasing migrant population from all over the country, attracted as much by the excellent education institutions as by the varied career opportunities.
The obvious solution lies in growing vertically as well as horizontally. More land will have to come within the purview of planned development, and building heights will need to increase from the currently permitted 70 metres – approximately 22 floors plus parking – to 100 metres or more. FSI, which still currently stagnates at 1, will need to be raised to at least 2, or even 2.5.
In 25 years, PCMC will be a skyscraper city on the lines of Gurgaon.
WORLD-CLASS INFRASTRUCTURE
In most cities, such growth would mean serious infrastructure challenges. We have already seen what happens in a city like Mumbai, where skyscrapers are being built without sufficient parking, connectivity and municipal amenities to support them. However, thanks to the master plan that PCMC will always adhere to, the necessary infrastructure will precede the building of high-rises. I firmly believe that 25 years from now, the Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation will serve as a national and even international benchmark for planned, scientific vertical real estate growth.
An essential pre-requisite to support this massive growth is an advanced public transport system. With an eye on this future requirement, PCMC has adopted a model similar to Ahmedabad’s Janmarg – a scientifically designed BRT-based  public transport system spanning 130 km across 14 routes in PCMC. This system involves 4-lane wide, exclusive roads with grade separators that will reduce the dependence on private transport in favour of more efficient public transport. This, in turn, will result in smooth traffic flow, less road blocks, radically lower pollution levels and a healthier, energy-conserving environment. To ensure that there are no hitches in the development of this lifeline, the PCMC has established an Urban Transport Fund for its funding.
Another pre-requisite for efficient transport is more connecting roadways. A ring road is on the drawing boards, but that will become truly effective only with the implementation of a hub-and-spoke road network. To illustrate this point, there are currently only two arterial roads connecting Pune with Pimpri-Chinchwad, and only two connecting Pimpri-Chinchwad with Chakan. These cannot sustain the enormous increase in vehicular traffic that industrial and residential growth will generate.
Again, it is my opinion that this alone may not suffice to cater to the public transport needs that will emerge over the next two decades. I personally feel that an elevated skybus or monorail network or even an underground rail network will be called for.
THE ULTIMATE GAMECHANGERS
I cannot end these musings without mentioning the new international airport being planned near Rajgurunagar and the International Convention Centre at Moshi, which will cover a sprawling 200 acres. The Convention Centre alone will spawn a huge tourism, hospitality and retail boom which will convert PCMC into a major urban destination both within and outside Maharashtra, perhaps second only to Mumbai. Global hotel chains will have redefined the hospitality sector, and the shopping centres will be populated by marquee retail brands.
In fact, the next two decades are surely going to see PCMC being catapulted into the international Big League, giving it a distinct global identity in its own right.
Anil Pharande is President, CREDAI – PCMC and Chairman, Pharande Spaces, one of the most innovative developers in Pimpri-Chinchwad

Chinchwad School Goes Plastic-Free

(TNN, Nov 10, 2010)
PUNE: The New English School in Chinchwadgaon is going plastic-free with the management and students taking initiatives not to use plastic on the school premises.
The Paryavaran Sanvardhan Samiti, an NGO, took up the initiative to promote use of eco-friendly products. Vikas Patil, president of the samiti, said that this was the first school in Pimpri-Chinchwad that has decided to go plastic-free.
The campaign, no plastic thrown’, was started a couple of months ago. The students do not bring any eatables wrapped in plastic, nor do they use plastic carry bags, Patil said.
According to Patil, the idea was to create awareness about the ill-effects of plastic through lectures and presentations in the school. In turn, the students create awareness at home.
“Initially, there were lectures about solid waste management, water treatment plant, cleaning of rivers, among others. After seeing a keen interest, we decided to start the campaign no plastic thrown’,” he said.
This Diwali, the students were asked not to burst firecrackers leading to noise pollution.
As the next step, the samiti plans to start vermicomposting, water recycling, reuse of notebook and paper, and reuse of chalk powder in the school. The campaign will be extended to other schools also.

Pune’s Cashless Bus Travel Project Nears Launch

(Indian Express, Nov 09 2010)
Pune is set to be the first city in the country to experiment with a common mobility card to enable commuters to travel cashless in city buses. The Pune Mahanagar Parivahan Mahamandal Limited (PMPML) is making arrangements for an early launch, but whether the date will be November 14 as announced earlier, will be decided on Wednesday.
The PMPML, in association with the Unit Trust of India (UTI) Bank, is rolling out the plan and a UTI team had recently visited Pune to see how things could be worked out.
As reported in September, the PMPML had made it public that it will introduce the common mobility card in Pune and Pimpri-Chinchwad as part of a Central government project. The concept of single ticket for all systems of public transport has been envisaged in the National Urban Transport Policy. The funding will be shared by the Centre under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JNNURM).
“We have organised a meeting with UTI officials to finalise how the plan can be launched soon. However, details will be disclosed after the meeting on Wednesday,” PMPML Chairman and Managing Director Dilip Band said.
Under the plan, a commuter would be able to travel on trains and buses using a single card and without buying any ticket once transport operators modernise their fleet to make smart card usage possible. The card is used in many developed countries. The Union government had selected Pune for a pilot run in buses.
Another senior PMPML official said, “The UTI team recently paid a visit to see how things could be worked out for the common mobility card. They collected necessary information. We have started preparations to keep necessary infrastructure in place. Hopefully, very soon, the terms and conditions will be finalised and signed.”
As per the preliminary plan, each card will cost Rs 40 and will be sold at authorised outlets. Card-readers installed in buses will calculate the fare from the boarding to disembarking points. Money will automatically be deducted on swiping the card. Cards will be available at around 50 centres in Pune and Pimpri-Chinchwad.

BRTS Premium Row: CREDAI Supports GB Resolution For Rate Reduction

(Pune Mirror, October 12, 2010)
The Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation (PCMC) has invited objections and suggestions for the reduction in the BRTS premium rates that have been passed by the general body (GB) of the municipal corporation.
More importantly, the Confederation of Real Estate Developers’ Associations of India (CREDAI) has come out in favour of the proposed reduction in premium rates effectively pitting the builder lobby against municipal commissioner.
Anil-Pharande
 
 
Anil Pharande, president, CREDAI Pimpri Chinchwad unit, said, “The premium rates decided earlier are very high and not practical. It will increase the cost of construction. Suppose, the rate for TDR is Rs 700 per sq ft and then PCMC asks us to pay a premium of Rs 900 per sq ft.
This itself adds up to Rs 1600 per sq feet to the overall cost. Hence, it is necessary to reduce the premium rates. The current proposal to charge 25 per cent of the ready reckoner rate is appropriate.”
In August, the PCMC GB passed a resolution to reduce the premium charges to 25 per cent of the ready reckoner rate for allowing extra FSI. The ready reckoner rate is the rate of the land decided by the government, which is generally very less as compared to the market rate of the land in that area. So, the premium cost would also come down substantially.
After the suggestions and objections have been tabled, the proposal would be sent to the State government for approval. The issue had created quite a furore, after Opposition members alleged that the reduction in premium would cause loss of thousands of crores of rupees in revenue to PCMC. Sharma had remarked then that the GB is asking for a drastic reduction in premium rates, which, in his view, should not be done.
The PCMC had planned eight BRTS corridors in PCMC and would be spending in excess of Rs 2,100 crore for consructing these. The PCMC would be spending around 30 to 40 per cent of this amount, while the rest would be funded under JNNURM by the Central and the State governments.
So, to recover to construction cost of these roads, PCMC is allowing 0.8 extra FSI upto 100 metres on each side of the BRTS roads. For giving this extra FSI, PCMC would charge premium rates of 300,600,900 per sq. ft in A,B,C zones in PCMC. The state government also approved the proposal.
“PCMC had earlier given the powers of deciding the rates of BRTS premium to the municipal commisioner and the administration. But they made a blunder and proposed very high premium rates, which would make construction costs unviable.
The rates that have been passed by the general body now are appropriate. We expect the State government to give approval to the same in the next two to three months.”
Current Development Control Rule
TDR generated from any of the zone, from the sanctioned development plan (DP) of old and extended limit shall be allowed in the BRT corridor on payment of premium charges, which should not be less than what is decided by the general body (GB).
These premium charges are to be decided by the PCMC Commisioner from time to time. Premium shall not be charged for the 0.4 FSI of road widening area of the receiving plot
Modification Proposed
TDR generated from any of the zone, from the sanctioned DP of old and extended limit shall be allowed in the BRT corridor on payment of premium charges, and the said premium shall not be charged as per the policy sanctioned by the govt but shall be charged at the rate of 25 per cent of the govt ready reckoner rate of the receiving plot. Premium shall not be charged for the 0.40 FSI of road widening area of the receiving plot.

Pimpri-Chinchwad Municipal Corporation (PCMC) Launches Unique Health Smart Card Scheme

(Indian Express, Oct 12 2010)
The Pimpri-Chinchwad Municipal Corporation (PCMC) on Monday launched its unique health smart card scheme. The first health card was issued for Mayor Yogesh Behl.
Municipal Commissioner Asheesh Sharma said health smart cards are aimed at doing away with tedious paper work. “Once the registration process and issue of health cards to patients gather momentum, we will gradually stop issuing case papers. The era of paperless hospitals is dawning in town,” he said.
Health cards, he said, would save a lot of time for patients who had to queue up for getting case papers and then lining up before the doctor. Sharma said every member of a family would get a health card.
The civic chief said the health smart cards are web-based which means the patients’ history can be obtained even by a doctor sitting in the US or UK. “Any doctor in the country or outside would be able to get the history of the patient from Pimpri-Chinchwad through Internet,” said Sharma. Pimpri-Chinchwad has a population of 15 lakh.
PCMC health chief Dr Nagkumar Kunachgi said the software for the health cards have been designed by Amruta Technology. “This year, we have a budget of Rs 3.75 crore for the health smart cards, including software and hardware,” he said.
Dr Anand Jagdale, medical superintendent of Yeshwantrao Chavan Medical Hospital, where the registration of patients and other details began, said, “The health smart cards would initially be issued only at YCM Hospital for Rs 20,” he said. Dr Jagdale said a patient coming with a health card will have also his details stored on the computer.
“If the doctor asks him to go for an X-ray, he won’t require a case paper. He will simply have to go to the X-ray depatment and the doctor will forward the details to the department,” he said. Dr Jagdale said initially the doctors will find a little more work load, but in the course of time, they will get used to it.
Dr Nagkumar said after YCM Hospital, the health smart cards will be issued at all other seven PCMC hospitals.

PCMC To Issue Show Cause Notice To Contractor

PUNE: The contractor responsible for cutting down trees and shrubs on the Pune-Mumbai highway near Alfa Laval in Kasarwadi will be served a show cause notice by the Pimpri-Chinchwad Municipal Corporation (PCMC) on Monday.
“Shrubs and small trees planted by the garden department to beautify the Pune-Mumbai highway have been cut without permission,” said Suresh Salunke, chief of the PCMC’s garden department. “The show cause notice will be issued to the contractor after PCMC offices open on Monday.”
According to Salunke, “The contractor has removed a 30 m-long road divider between the service road and the concrete lanes of the Pune-Mumbai highway, near Alfa Laval. It was removed to create a new exit point for vehicles on the concrete lanes to access the service road since the construction of a flyover at Nashik Phata is in progress. The contractor should have taken the permission of the garden department and the tree authority before cutting down the trees and plants. He was told to take permission regarding this but he still went ahead and cut them down.
“Action will be taken against the contractor under provisions of the Maharashtra Urban Areas Tree Act 1975,” said Salunke. “A fine of Rs 5,000 can be imposed on the violator and a case can also be lodged against him.”
Nandkumar Saturdekar, former member of the PCMC’s Tree Authority stressed the need for maintaining the green cover of the township. “The trees and greenery in the industrial township of Pimpri-Chinchwad needs to be protected to withstand the effects of rapid urbanisation like pollution.”

PCMC Land Acquisition Notices Sent To 1,800 People

(Times of India, October 6 2010)
PUNE:  The land acquisition office of the Pimpri Chinchwad Municipal Corporation has sent notices to 1,800 people in Kalewadi to acquire land for construction of a road from MM School to the Pavana river. This half-km stretch is part of the Kalewadi phata-Dehu Alandi road bus rapid transit system (BRTS) route.
P G Nale, special land acquisition officer said, “The office started sending notices to the people 10 days ago.
“The notices have been served under the urgency clause of land acquisition as the land is urgently needed to construct the road. The land acquisition department will take possession of the land on October 20. Enquiry about the land owners and the area needed for the road will be conducted after October 27,” Nale said.
Nale said that details of the plot partitions registered in the revenue survey were available with the office but the civic body did not know who the actual owners were. Hence, notices had been sent to all the plot owners according to the survey numbers.
“We need to acquire very little land for the road which has a length of 500 m, he said. The road will be 45 m wide. The land on the right side of this road is within Pimpri-Chinchwad New Township Development Authority (PCNTDA) limits while that on the left side is within PCMC limits,” he said.
“The land within PCNTDA limits had been acquired by the authority many years ago and no compensation needs to be given. The PCNTDA will just transfer the land to the PCMC after the land acquisition drive,” Nale said.
The stretch is part of an 11-km BRTS route being built by the PCMC under the Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission scheme.